Call for proposals: Presentations ELAG 2017

ELAG 2017 Conference presentations 7-9 June 2017, Athens, Greece

Are your proud of the work you have been doing ? Do you think you know stuff you should share ? Do you have a great idea ? Are you able to teach your colleagues something ? Make yourself heard by doing a presentation at Elag 2017 !

The theme that was chosen for this year conference is ‘Automation’. Over the last years, library automation was very focused on data treatment and end user interfaces. These are still very important fields of interest and we welcome workshop proposals and interesting presentation proposals in these fields. But this year we would like to focus a bit more on library workflows. More focus on library back office activities. Especially for back office actvities that support a modern library. So this can go from using ‘intelligent’ devices in libraries to processing and using user activity logs in library back office processes. I hope you are just excited about this theme as we are.

We hope this quite general theme will inspire you to present your thoughts and work.

For more inspiration, see the sub-themes page: https://elag.org/2016/11/09/sub-themes-elag-2017/

Guidelines for conference presentations are available at: https://elag.org/2015/11/09/presentation-guidelines/

ELAG 2017 will be jointly organized by the National Technical University of Athens, the Hellenic Academic Libraries Link, the National Library of Greece and the Department of Librarianship and Information Systems of the Technological Education Institute of Athens.

To propose a presentation, please complete the form below and send to: Peter van Boheemen (peter.vanboheemen@wur.nl), Chair of the ELAG 2017 Programme Committee

All proposals will be reviewed by the ELAG 2017 Programme Committee

The deadline for proposals is the February 19th 2017.

The results of the review process will be sent by March 3rd 2017.

Format

Title:
Name of presenter(s):
About the presenter(s):
Intended audience:
Abstract:


Call for proposals: Workshops ELAG 2017

ELAG 2017 workshops 7-9 June 2017, Athens, Greece

Would you like to lead a stimulating discussion with a group of library technologists?

Do you prefer encouraging audience participation rather giving a formal lecture?

Do you have a specific area of expertise that you would like to discuss with like-minded colleagues?

Then lead a workshop during ELAG 2017!

Workshops are a unique feature and an important part of the ELAG conference. They give participants an opportunity to acquire new skills, enhance their knowledge and get a more in-depth view of a specific topic.

The keyword for ELAG conferences is participation, so ELAG workshops strive to be interactive, hands-on and solution-based in order to draw from the experience and knowledge of participants and produce useful advances, solutions or recommendations for the library community.

A workshop leader will have a good grasp or some experience of the subject, but it is not necessary to be a top expert in the field (though in the past many renowned experts have run ELAG workshops). A good workshop leader will present a topic and then stimulate discussion and exchange of views and experiences rather than lecture.

Last year we had workshops on linked open data, extending your discovery interface, wiki data, Fedora and more.

ELAG 2017 will be jointly organized by the National Technical University of Athens, the Hellenic Academic Libraries Link, the National Library of Greece and the Department of Librarianship and Information Systems of the Technological Education Institute of Athens.

Elag participants take part in 1 workshop per conference. There will usually be two time slots during the first two days of the conference. This way, people will spend about 4 hours in a workshop. On the third conference day, all workshops will present their results. Further guidelines for workshop leaders and participants are available at: https://elag.org/2014/10/15/workshop-guidelines/

For inspiration about topics for your workshop, see the sub-themes page: https://elag.org/2016/11/09/sub-themes-elag-2017/ ……………... But don’t be afraid to propose another idea!

To propose a workshop, please complete the form below and send it to:

Peter van Boheemen (peter.vanboheemen@wur.nl), Chair of the ELAG 2017 Programme Committee.

All proposals will be reviewed by the ELAG 2017 Programme Committee.

The deadline for proposals is February 19th 2017.

The results of the review process will be sent by March 3rd 2017.

Format

Workshop Title:
Name(s):
Audience:
Maximum number of participants:
Short description (up to 250 words):
Workshop outcomes:


Call for proposals: Pre-Conference Bootcamps ELAG 2017

Are you a library hacker who has found new ways to leverage library data to build 21st century services?

Are you a systems implementer boosting productivity by rapidly building innovative applications?

Do you think you’ve found a better way to create or deliver information for library users?

A programme of optional Bootcamps offer ELAG participants the opportunity to learn new skills or enhance their knowledge of specific topics related to library technology. These Bootcamps provide participants a way to learn from experts and veterans in a particular domain. Hands-on and fast-paced, these Bootcamps give a primer on the most up-to-date practices in library automation and provide insights into new, upcoming technologies. Bootcamp leaders have the opportunity to present their work, test their applications in new contexts and find collaboration partners.

Please share your expertise, show what you can do, and meet with other library enthusiasts.

ELAG 2017 will be jointly organized by the National Technical University of Athens, the Hellenic Academic Libraries Link, the National Library of Greece and the Department of Librarianship and Information Systems of the Technological Education Institute of Athens.

Bootcamps have a duration of 1 day and will be held on the day before the Elag conference. Guidelines for Bootcamp leaders are available at: https://elag.org/2014/10/15/pre-conference-bootcamp-guidelines/

Last year’s event saw lively discussions and developments on topics such as Jupyter notebooks, command line tools, building integrated discovery indexes and JPEG 2000.  For inspiration about topics for your workshop at this year’s ELAG conference, see the sub-themes page: https://elag.org/2016/11/09/sub-themes-elag-2017/

To propose a Bootcamp, please complete the form below and send to: Peter van Boheemen (peter.vanboheemen@wur.nl), Chair of the ELAG 2017 Programme Committee

All proposals will be reviewed by the ELAG 2017 Programme Committee

The deadline for proposals is  February 19th 2017.

The results of the review process will be sent by March 1st 2017.

Format

Pre-conference Bootcamp Title:
Name(s):
Expected time slot:
Audience:
Expertise:
Required:
Programming experience:
Short description:


Sub themes ELAG 2017

ELAG 2017 – Automation

For many years, library automation was focused on increasing access to (meta)data collections and improving end user interfaces. These fields are still important and of interest (we welcome workshop proposals and interesting presentation proposals). This year however we would like to focus on library workflows. What are the current tools available to full automate typical back office activities. How can ‘intelligent’ devices provide the best services possible? Can in our age of self-driving cars, intelligent personal assistants, and artificial intelligence, library software be upgraded into fully automated machines? What metrics can be used to measure the success of these services? What kind of automation hardware and software need to enter the library IT- stack?

I hope you are just excited about this theme as we are.

Workflow automation

Workflow automation is the class of procedures that manage and orchestrate business activities, resources and services in an organization. Workflow engines provide the tools to create a full description of all the required steps in business activities and monitors the state of these activities. Workflows can be tuned and optimized (semi)-automatically to maximize specific goals (e.g. shortest time to serve a request, maximize processed items). Examples of workflows in libraries are the steps required for moving items to and from the depots (from user request, to printing of a depot slip, to fetching books, to make them available to the end users while keeping track of the status), or a scanning digitization workflows (fetching books, scanning, post-processing, metadata management, digital archiving and providing access copies), or even managing servers (use microservices to automatically increase processing power when needed).

ELAG is interested not only in the workflow engines themselves but especially how automation is used to build intelligent systems which provide an optimized execution of typical library services.

We would like you to talk about:

  • How to create intelligent (automated) workflows to do activities one couldn’t do before?
  • Automation of existing workflows, where can machines take over and lead an activity?
  • How is orchestration used in your library to automatically maximize services?
  • Which metrics and statistics are being used to measure and optimize the service success rate?
  • What tools are used to describe and orchestrate library workflows?

Statistics, Metrics

Visualization links the two most powerful information processing systems known: the human mind and the modern computer.  As a process, it transforms data, information and knowledge into a visual form exploiting people’s natural strengths in rapid visual pattern recognition. Effective visual interfaces enable us to observe, manipulate, search, navigate, explore, filter, discover, understand, and interact with large volume of data far more rapidly and far more effectively to discover hidden patterns.  The impact of visualization has been fundamental leading to new insights and more efficient decision-making.

Reporting is a fundamental part of business intelligence and knowledge management. These implementations involve extract, transform, and load (ETL) procedures in coordination with a data warehouse and using reporting tools.

One of the best ways to get a message across is to use visualization to quickly draw attention to the key messages, and by presenting data visually it’s also possible to uncover surprising patterns and observations that wouldn’t be apparent from looking at statistics alone.  Reporting and visualization can be used to present the library’s achievements for example when creating monthly or annuals reports and making them more interesting and easier to read.

For many years librarians have developed best practices to assist them in the selection and acquisition of materials they believed best to fit their patrons. Recently libraries had to adjust to the shift from print to electronic. Libraries have already developed bibliographic structures to accommodate the printed book and its acquisition, description and classification.  Today through demand driven actions users become partners in collection development. We should check the implementation of DDA (Demand Driven Actions) in library collection, the costs for the libraries, as well as collection sustainability.

Some things to consider for automatic response of systems on registered metrics:

  • Data that help inform collections management and strategy
  • Data to assist in the development of new services and to improve the user experience
  • Data to better understand user behaviors
  • Data that uncover new types of impact and value for institutions and organizations

Self service

Libraries are offering a wide range of self services for their patrons: self registration of library accounts, self checkout and return of physical items, payment machines for library fees, access to learning and reading rooms, download of electronic resources, or even 24/7 complete self service libraries like the “Open Libraries” in Denmark. When these services are user friendly, safe and robust, they can help to cut costs and improve user satisfaction in libraries. They must integrate well with the wider library automation environment, like integrated library systems, patron directories, payment systems etc.

We also see new self-services being offered by libraries, like ISBN or DOI self registration services.

We would like to hear about:

  • What services are you planning to offer as new self-services in the future? And how?
  • What are the technical problems implementing self-services? And how to solve them?
  • What library services are hard to offer as a self-service? And how did you manage to do it anyway?
  • What about “self services” like Sci-Hub?

Machine learning

Libraries are there to help users find the information they need. New waves of information overload bring new kinds of information technology into play. Does the current information deluge require the use of machine learning to cope? Are you providing automated reading processes to aid your users navigate the flow of new articles in their fields? Do you operate an infrastructure for extracting and recombining data entities from scientific literature? Is automated pattern recognition an integral part of your subject indexing process? Or do you employ Named-entity Recognition, or Natural Language Processing, in a smart way? How much AI goes into your discovery and recommendation services? Maybe you don’t have full-fledged programs in production – but perhaps you have run a pilot? Tell us how it worked out (or worked not). Or if you’re planning a project, make your case and lay out a framework for engaged reactions and advice.

We would like to hear about:

  • Machine learning
  • Automated reading
  • Automated abstracting and indexing
  • Use of predictive algorithms.
  • Use of automized semantic science entities
  • Linked science automation
  • Recommending systems

Robots, hardware, Raspberry Pi, Arduino

The Internet of things (IoT) can be divided in two broad categories: 1) information and analysis, 2) Automation and control.

In information and analytics category, there are the types of applications:

  • Tracking behavior
  • Enhanced situational awareness
  • Sensor-driven decision analytics

For automation and control, we can describe the following types of applications:

  • Process optimization
  • Optimized resource consumption
  • Complex autonomous systems

Some of the potential areas for implementation of IoT in libraries include the following:

  • RFID (Libraries already use RFID technology for self checkout, but it can be used for information sharing also)
  • popular aisles (pressure pads under the floor can collect data about people standing, so we can extract statistics about how popular some study areas are)
  • library wearable’s (for example, library card or a wrist band could hold all the person’s information, give access to computers, reading history etc)
  • beacons (they can be used to locate people in the library and give personalized info based on person’s interests and their current location)
  • mobile payments, ticketing and event registration (these devices will be able to tell users about overdue books and how much fine they owe to the library, to enable them return the overdue books and pay the fine online without needing to stand in a queue in the library)

We would like to hear you talk about:

  • Which hardware tools are entering your library?
  • In what way these devices can work autonomous and make “intelligent” decisions?
  • How do these machines change the library environment and what new tasks are possible that required a lot of manual labor in the past?

Presentation guidelines

1. Description of ELAG presentations

In ELAG conferences, we divide our time between visiting workshop meetings and presentations.

At a three day conference we will have slots of 30 minutes for people that have submitted a proposal to do a presentation. This means a speaker has to prepare for a 25 minute presentation, since we need some time for a question and some time to get the next speaker going.

The ELAG program committee sends out a call for proposals about 6 months before the conference. The committee members evaluate proposals and will select no more than 14 presentations.

The first day there will also be a keynote presentation. A keynote speaker is asked to do a presentation by the ELAG progam committee and will be given 1 hour to do a presentation.

Participants are also encouraged to speak at two slots of 45 minutes that are reserved for Lightning Talks. Participants can register for this at the conference.

These slots will be programmed on the second and third day of the conference.

2. Guidelines for speakers

Your audience is familiar with library automation issues.

However, they will be a mixture of technical and less technical people. If you want to be really technical, that’s fine, but make this known beforehand.

If you want to get into details or would like to discuss concepts, consider a workshop proposal.

If you want to prepare for a ‘hands-on’ event, consider a pre-conference Bootcamp proposal.

Please make sure your presentation does not exceed 25 minutes, considering your 30 minute time slot.

3. Guidelines for Lightning Talks

Please register early at the start of the conference, to select your favourite time slot.

5 minutes is short, but it really helps you to focus on what is important about what you want to tell your audience.


Pre-conference bootcamp guidelines

1. Description of ELAG pre-conference bootcamps

Pre-conference bootcamps take place the day before the conference proper and typically have a more technical, hands-on focus. They are typically 1/2-day (3 hour) or 1-day (6 hour) sessions with 10-20 people. Participants will bring their laptops, other facilities like Internet access, power cables and other computer support can be made available. Bootcamps are typically centred on tools that are readily available on the Internet as open source or web services. The technical backgrounds of the participants can include a mix of programming, systems and metadata experts.

2. Guidelines for Bootcamp leaders

Here is an outline of the tasks that you will need to undertake when leading a bootcamp:

  • define Bootcamp aims and objectives
  • specify the intended audience
  • outline the desired outcomes of the Bootcamp
  • think about how to make the bootcamp as active and engaging as possible
  • prepare a schedule for the Bootcamp
  • prepare a description of the Bootcamp and some resources for users to read before coming to the Bootcamp
  • communicate with participants prior to the Bootcamp in order to establish relationship and get some useful feedback that will help you better plan your workshop. The conference organisers will provide you with the list of participants who signed up for your workshop approximately two weeks before the conference and give you some basic information about them (job titles and why they have signed up for the Bootcamp)

3. Example of a typical pre-conference Bootcamp

Title: Searching with SOLR
Name(s): Tanya Mullard and John Giles
Expected time slot: 3 hours
Audience: Systems librarians, systems operators
Expertise: Basic Windows/Linux administration, XML.
Required: local Java JDK 1.5 (or better) installation, SOLR (will be made available), Internet connection Programming experience: Not required.
Short description: We will install a SOLR server, look into data types, indexing, and querying. At the end you will run your own search engine.


Workshop guidelines

1. Description of ELAG workshops

Workshops are a unique and significant feature of the ELAG conference. They give participants an opportunity to acquire new skills, enhance their knowledge, and get a more in-depth view of a specific topic they are interested in. The keyword for ELAG conference is participation, so ELAG workshops strive to be interactive, hands-on and discussion-solution based in order to draw from the experience and knowledge of participants and produce useful advances, solutions, or recommendations for the library community.

There are usually around 10 workshops to choose from, each of them involving 5 to 30 people. Workshop sessions are integrated into the conference programme and are spread over the first two days of the conference. The overall duration of workshop sessions is between 4 and 5 hours and there is an additional session on the final day of conference for short reports on each workshop. All workshops run in parallel and each participant can choose only one workshop to attend throughout the whole conference.

2. Guidelines for workshop leaders

Workshops are intended to be an in-depth examination of an issue, which means they should be very focused and detailed in order to provide added value to participants. It is important to structure the workshop so that the workshop leader is not talking for more than 1/3 of the time. The best workshops draw on the experience and knowledge of the participants and the workshop leader stimulate participants to be active by asking questions and posing problems. A workshop therefore builds on interaction and collaboration between participants using discussion, hands-on exercises, brainstorming, team work, etc. It is the role of the workshop leader to keep the topic streamlines and focused, so that participants are able to create useful content and outputs.

Preparing a workshop:

  • define workshop aims and objectives
  • specify the intended audience
  • outline the desired outcomes of the workshop
  • think about how to make the workshop as active and engaging as possible
  • prepare a schedule for the workshop
  • prepare a description of the workshop and some resources for users to read before coming to the workshop
  • communicate with participants prior to the workshop in order to establish relationship and get some useful feedback that will help you better plan your workshop
  • conference organisers will provide you with the list of participants who signed up for your workshop approximately two weeks before the conference and give you some basic information about them (job titles and why they have signed up for the workshop)

Conference participants sign up for workshops on the basis of descriptions provided by the workshop leader, so be sure to prepare: 1. A short, well-rounded, and attractive paragraph that presents the basis for people to decide whether to sign up for one workshop or another. It should outline the topic, problems, and issues that need to be addressed as well as the structure and goals of the workshop. 2. A short set of resources (key 3 to 5 documents) to provide some introductory or background reading on the topic so that participants get a better idea of what the workshop will be about and also to decrease the differences between the knowledge of participants.

Leading a workshop:

  • introduce yourself and your professional background
  • introduce the aim and the process of the workshop (especially for first time ELAG participants)
  • let the participants quickly introduce themselves, talk about their organization and what they hope to get out of the workshop : this allows you to tailor the workshop to the specific needs of attendees, and also lets participants get a sense of other workshop members
  • be flexible in adjusting your workshop according to the number and profile of the participants
  • give clear instructions and timeframes
  • allow sufficient time for discussion and for preparing outputs

Workshop leaders are expected to attend the conference and pay for their own travel, accommodation, and registration fees. As a workshop leader you take on a considerable responsibility, but one that we hope will bring benefit and opportunity to your organization as well. In addition to having you and your organization promoted, the workshop itself presents a valuable chance for you to share your expertise in a very focused and in-depth way and discuss the topic you feel passionate about.

Final day presentation:

On the final day, each workshop is presented to other ELAG participants. It is preferred that one or more participants (and not the leader) prepare and present the report. The presentations should therefore not be a tutorial but a report on what the group has been working on during the sessions, what topics were discussed and what were the main concerns, what was the general profile of participants, and what recommendations to the community arouse from the group.

3. Guidelines for workshop participants

Before the workshop:

  • read all the information provided by the leader in order to get familiar with the topics
  • if the leader contacts you, answer him/her with useful information as it will help prepare a better workshop
  • the leader is not the one who knows the most about the topic, he is there to manage the group, so prepare to be active and participate
  • think what you or your own institution can contribute to the workshop, think especially about the projects or experiences you may have
  • prepare examples you want to share with others or comment on
  • if possible, look at the other participant’s profiles.

Attending a workshop:

  • keep in mind that your participation in the workshop is very important, so get involved in the discussions and ask or explain whatever you think could be useful
  • try to help the leader during the workshop.